Azhar Najafi Craniosacral Therapy & Reflexology in Acton and Holborn

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Craniosacral Therapy?

CranioSacral Therapy (CST) is a gentle, hands-on approach that releases tensions deep in the body to relieve pain and dysfunction and improve whole-body health and performance.
Using a soft touch which is generally no greater than 5 grams - about the weight of a nickel - practitioners release restrictions in the soft tissues that surround the central nervous system. CST is increasingly used as a preventive health measure for its ability to bolster resistance to disease, and it is effective for a wide range of medical problems associated with pain and dysfunction.

How does it work?

Few structures have as much influence over the body's ability to function properly as the brain and spinal cord that make up the central nervous system. And, the central nervous system is heavily influenced by the Craniosacral system - the membranes and fluid that surround, protect and nourish the brain and spinal cord.
Every day your body endures stresses and strains that it must work to compensate for. Unfortunately, these changes often cause body tissues to tighten and distort the Craniosacral system. These distortions can then cause tension to form around the brain and spinal cord resulting in restrictions. This can create a barrier to the healthy performance of the central nervous system, and potentially every other system it interacts with.
Fortunately, such restrictions can be detected and corrected using simple methods of touch. With a light touch, the CST practitioner uses his or her hands to evaluate the craniosacral system by gently feeling various locations of the body to test for the ease of motion and rhythm of the cerebrospinal fluid pulsing around the brain and spinal cord. Soft-touch techniques are then used to release restrictions in any tissues influencing the craniosacral system.
By normalising the environment around the brain and spinal cord and enhancing the body's ability to self-correct, CranioSacral Therapy is able to alleviate a wide variety of dysfunctions, from chronic pain and sports injuries to stroke and neurological impairment.

Conditions that commonly respond well to Craniosacral therapy?

Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury, Migraines and Headaches, Chronic Neck and Back Pain, Autism, Stress and Tension-Related Disorders
Motor-Coordination Impairments, Infant and Childhood Disorders, Brain and Spinal Cord Injuries, Chronic Fatigue, Fibromyalgia, TMJSyndrome, Scoliosis, Central Nervous System Disorders, Learning Disabilities, ADD/ADHD, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder,
Orthopedic Problems, And Many Other Conditions

Why Craniosacral Therapy?

Craniosacral Therapy supports your body’s innate ability to balance, restore and heal itself, as well as helping to reduce stress and build your underlying energy. The practitioner sense tensions in the body and helps to release them in a supported and comfortable way. During or after a session you may feel calm and energised, with increased clarity of mind and a feeling of well-being.

Reflexology

Is reflexology suitable for me?

Reflexology is a therapy which can be received by anyone at any age, from newborn babies to those receiving end of life care, and everyone in between. However, there may occasionally be times when it is not suitable to provide a treatment. The best advice we can give you is to give your local reflexologist a ring and ask! Please note: reflexology should not be used as an alternative to seeking medical advice.

Will reflexology help me?

Reflexology is a very individual treatment which is tailored to you as a whole person, taking into account both physical and non-physical factors that might be affecting your wellbeing. Some people find it works for them – some don’t. The best way to find out is to try it!
The theory is that reflexology helps the body to restore its balance naturally. Usually, after a treatment your tension may be reduced and you might feel relaxed. You might also notice yourself sleeping better and find your mood and sense of wellbeing improving. You may also find that other aspects improve too; however, this happens on an individual basis.
There have been some positive research projects carried out with reflexology; however, as yet, there is not a large enough body of evidence for us to make clinical claims of effectiveness.
With ever increasing levels of stress in everyday life, it is important for people to take more responsibility for their own healthcare needs. Reflexology may be one of the ways to mitigate the stresses of modern life.

What happens when I go for a treatment?

A full medical history will be requested on your first treatment, and you will be asked to sign a consent form for treatment. This information will be kept confidential. Reflexology is a very easy therapy to receive; depending on the type of reflexology, the most clothing that will have to be removed for a treatment to take place will be your socks and shoes.
The therapist will then use their hands to apply pressure to the feet, lower leg, hands, ears or face, depending on the type of reflexology chosen. You may feel areas of transient discomfort during the treatment, but generally the experience should be relaxing.
The therapist may recommend a course of treatments.
 
How will I feel after a reflexology treatment?

It is useful to give feedback to the reflexologist as this may show the response of your body to treatment. This in turn might help the reflexologist to tailor a treatment plan specific to your needs. After one or two treatments your body may respond in a very noticeable way. Most people note a sense of well-being and relaxation; however, sometimes people report feeling lethargic, nauseous or tearful, but this is usually transitory and reflexologists believe that it is part of the healing process.

Can reflexology help me during pregnancy?

There are several reasons why women might choose to use complementary therapies such as reflexology during pregnancy. These include morning sickness, insomnia and pelvic pain. Reflexology is also used by some women to manage pain during labour and birth.

What do I need to know about using it during pregnancy?

As with all complementary therapies, it is recommended that you inform your midwife if you are thinking of trying reflexology while you are pregnant.
Reflexology does not involve taking anything into the body that might affect the developing baby unlike some other forms of complementary therapies. Also, you can sit or lie in a position that is comfortable for you during the massage.
While reflexology is generally considered to be safe, some people may experience side effects such as feeling light-headed, emotional, or very tired.


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